Netanyahu-Boehner Gambit is a Threat to U.S. Jews

Once a Public School, Now a Yeshiva

Once a Public School, Now a Yeshiva

Jewish people in America are generally grateful (and sometimes amazed) that “Conservatives,” including Evangelicals and much of the far Right are strong supporters of Israel and have close, warm ties (now) with the Jewish-American community.

There are still plenty of neo Nazis and white supremacist out there baiting and hating Jews, and vandalizing synagogues.  And now there are many folks on the Left who regard Israel in the same category as Apartheid South Africa in its treatment of Palestinians.  Jimmy Carter said that in a book.  Yes, a lot of Jewish Americans are grateful for heartland and bible belt support in the U.S.

But that can fall apart real fast if the U.S. has to send several hundred thousand troops to the middle east to support an Israeli war with Iran (and its proxies), after the nuclear arms talks with Iran fail. It will be easy to assign the blame to the Israeli Prime Minister who wants the negotiations to fall apart; and who will have said that in an unprecedented speech before the U.S. Congress.

When American casualties start to mount  (and that’s not even a worst case), will mothers and fathers in the U.S. heartland and bible belt remain on the side of Israelis and Jews? (It would be no shame to waiver). Or will they join the Left in blaming it on Israeli interference in American elections and politics, “controlling U.S. foreign policy” (as in tail wagging the dog)?

Things like this can turn on a dime these days, when movements or coalitions years in the making can be destroyed in weeks and months, over social networks. The Iran nuclear talks are apt to fail anyway. Why are Netanyahu and Boehner making it amazingly simple to blame it on Israel?

Advertisements

11 thoughts on “Netanyahu-Boehner Gambit is a Threat to U.S. Jews

  1. Russ Lehman

    As some Dems consider boycotting Bibi’s speech, I wonder whether a purely political response is appropriate to what clearly was a politically motivated move by the Speaker…and PM. Bibi doesn’t like Obama and clearly wants to be re-elected in March. Showing he has power in DC might enhance his chances. Also he is pissed about Iran negotiations and wants to scuttle the talks. Boehner… well where we know where he stands on trying to screw Obama any way he can, even if, like here, in the heretofore protected arena of foreign affairs. It is an incredible shame that Congress has been degraded to this point but that is where we are.While our relationship with our important ally should be paramount, and in many ways actually is despite these shenanigans, would it be wrong for the VP and many other Dems to simply not show up to the party, thereby depriving Boehner and Bibi of their crass and shameful poke in the face? Of course the incredibly important issue of the nuclear talks with Iran, the actual underlying point here, is another topic for another piece. Bibi is not serving the people of Israel well, and like Bush in the U.S., has seriously devalued Israel’s brand around the world.

    Like

    Reply
    1. Irv Lefberg Post author

      Russ, thank you , and well said. You added several related and vital points to the BiBi-Boehner affair that I wasn’t able to say on my very short post. Very sad and also scary state if affairs. Some Dems might boycott the show , but I think most would be afraid of offending APAC. Thanks again for great comment.

      Like

      Reply
  2. Rosemary Ryan

    I am one of those liberal democrats who wishes Netanyahu and the Israeli right would negotiate with the Palestinians and stop the fighting. My understanding is that there are many Israelis who feel the same. I imagine that unwinding a centuries-old tradition of conflict is complex and difficult under the best of circumstances – and that they do not exist. Not with the hawks and militants on all sides of the issue.

    I spent some time in Mozambique, 10 years past the end of a destructive 30 year civil war in which foreign assistance fueled both sides. I asked people there why it stopped when it did and the answer I got was that people got sick of fighting. Their hope for peace seemed to hinge on people’s memory of how bad war had been. There was no resolution. They lost their appetite for fighting.

    Interested in your thoughts about what it would take to end the fighting between Israel and its neighbors.

    Like

    Reply
    1. Irv Lefberg

      Thanks very much for comment, Rosemary, and interesting perspective and comparison with Mozambique. You certainly ask the most important question. I think the more extreme elements on both sides have now captured their respective political systems so that it’s impossible right now for “leaders” to negotiate something acceptable to a majority. And even if they did there are even more extreme elements that would sabotage it. That of course has happened a few times since 1948. Very demoralizing. I am a believer in the capacity of economic and education reforms (major ones) to turn things around in the occupied territories. I’ve never understood why that hasn’t been the focus of efforts in the region as a prelude to a reL, effective negotiated peace. I always thought U.S. , France, , Britain, Israel, Saudis, Jordan, Turkey , a few others had (still have) the collective capacity to implement a Marshall type economic development plan. But it’s harder now today than it would have been a few decades ago — a lot more mistrust, and spread of extremism throughout region. Sigh

      Like

      Reply
  3. Gerry O'Keefe

    Have you watched the documentary, “The Gatekeepers?” The maker interviews all of the past heads of Shinbet (sp?). Exposes the many tragedies & lost opportunities in past years.

    Like

    Reply
  4. Irv Lefberg

    Thanks very much Gerry for both comments. Have not seen Gatekeepers, but sounds like very worth seeing. Thank you for tip. Totally agree with your first comment about how US looks on world stage. I meet tourists all the time here around SD and get questions like,”What’s going on with you guys here in US?” It’s a circus in DC and in Koch financed world. Oy vey.

    Like

    Reply
    1. Irv Lefberg Post author

      Thanks Kurt. I hadn’t seen this. Yes, also a lot of opposition in Israel to this ploy. I think the globalization if communications has contributed to this sort of phenomenon. Recall that English PM David Cammeron lobbied some US congressmen urging them not to pass more sanctions on Iran right now. I think everybody everywhere /- even heads of state — feel they can communicate with everyone everywhere; the old lines and protocols are disappearing. Not a defense of BiBi

      Like

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s